Celebrating TinkerWomen!

WonderWomenMarch is Women’s History Month!

Over the course of the last year in working with the Tinkercad team, I have been exposed to amazing women in the field of design, making and tinkering. Seeing women drive innovation is something I get to witness everyday at our Pier 9 offices in San Francisco, but being able to explain how things work to my two young girls is even better. Each night when I get home, they rush over and want to play with Legos, help measure out ingredients to make dinner or reuse cardboard to make a house for a snail.

Today I wanted to highlight a few women that you may be familiar with or not. Who are the TinkerWomen that inspire you? Let us know who should be added to the list!

– Sarah from Team Tinkercad

Limor Fried: Adafruit was founded in 2005 by MIT engineer, Limor “Ladyada” Fried. Her goal was to create the best place online for learning electronics and making the best designed products for makers of all ages and skill levels. Limor was the first female engineer on the cover of WIRED magazine and was recently awardedEntrepreneur magazine’s Entrepreneur of the year. Ladyada is on the NYC Industrial Business Advisory Council. In 2014 Adafruit was ranked #11 in the top 20 USA manufacturing companies and #1 in New York City by Inc. 5000 “fastest growing private companies”.

Ayah Bdeir: Ayah Bdeir is the founder and CEO of littleBits, an award-winning library of electronic modules that snap together with magnets to allow anyone to learn, build, and invent with electronics. Bdeir is an engineer, interactive artist and one of the leaders of the open source hardware movement. Bdeir’s career and education have centered on advancing open source hardware to make education and innovation more accessible to people around the world.

Catarina Mota: Catarina is an open source advocate, educator and researcher, working to support knowledge sharing practices and equal access to transformative technologies. She is co-founder of Open Materials (do-it-yourself smart materials), Everywhere Tech (open source technology transfer), and AltLab (Lisbon’s hackerspace). She has taught numerous hands-on workshops on hi-tech materials and simple circuitry with the goal of encouraging people with little to no science background to take a proactive interest in science, technology and knowledge-sharing.

Reatha Aery: If you are scratching your head on this one, you should be. Reatha is my grandmother who taught me to be a tinker since I was a little girl. After raising her seven children, my grandmother was tireless in her efforts to teach me and my cousins that girls can do anything. Summers at her house were full of backyard play, trips to the junk yard to find something to take a part and continual questions started with you can do it!

Lily & Stephanie: The team that works on Tinkercad is great but Lily and Stephanie are the best. They come up with new ways to keep the product relevant, listen to customers and make sure that our users get the best! Cheers to our TinkerWomen!

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One comment

  1. I knew about Tinkercad from when they first started (Maker Faire) but never got a minute (or two) to check it out. I am an author at wikiHow.com and will be writing some articles about Tinkercad. I look forward to learning about the software/app.

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