HIGHFIV3D: Autonomous Reassurance Device – Part 1

During the month of March, there are a few different music-themed things happening: SXSW and more festivals you can shake a stick at (it’s even Music in our Schools Month!), so we’re thinking about sound and music here at 123D. There are tons of great related models in the 123D gallery that we’ll be remixing and playing with for the next few weeks, and a couple of us have been focusing on sound-related projects using 123D Circuits – look for #LISTEN3D 

As an at-best-novice with electronics, I decided to step lightly and integrate Circuits with some other projects I’ve been wanting to try. The first is, naturally, a High-Five machine.  While it has nothing to do with music, per se, I think I’ll learn a lot about the audio/electronics side and 123D Circuits.

The idea is this: a free-standing hand that you can interact with for a bit of reassurance when walking to get a cup of coffee.  When you give it a healthy palm smack, it will generate some positive words of encouragement – think “You’re Awesome!” or “Oh Yeah!”.  Within a cardboard-stacked hand, a sensor would register impact and trigger the audio. My first thought was a Piezo sensor in the hand, but after some words of wisdom (and a high-five) I decided to go with an accelerometer that would determine when the hand was moved, thus activating the audio output.

The Mona Lisa started out on notebook paper, btw.

The first step is building the physical hand and then we’ll figure out how the passerby will interact with it – table mounted seems the easiest, but wall-mounted would be a little cooler.  I considered using 123D Catch to create a model of my own hand and arm, but while messing around on 123D Creature, I found a really great model by Mark Dollar!  It’s a bit cartoonish and big, so it should be perfect.

 

I downloaded the model and opened it in MeshMixer to open up the fingers a bit more for a proper high-five.  Then took it into Tinkercad to work on the cut out.  I think a 1″ dowel is a fine way to make the ‘arm’.  I also made a little hollow for the accelerometer.

Once I was happy with the cutout, it was on to 123D Make to generate the slices for the laser cutter.  I wanted to keep it close to human scale, so I made it about 9″ tall.  Once cut, the only tedious bit was the fingers (hopefully they’ll withstand some trauma).

Now I need to go shopping, look for next steps and more Sound & Music posts soon.

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